Occasionally during an emergency or for a serious illness a dog may require a lifesaving blood transfusion. This is most commonly needed due to internal organ bleeding caused by trauma, from ingesting a toxin, particularly rat baits or illnesses like anaemia.

Some veterinary clinics have their own canine blood bank set up with stores of blood on hand for these situations. Other veterinary clinics may have a list of potential blood donor candidates that they can call on to give blood in the case of emergency. Like humans, dog’s do have different blood types and can even have more than one blood type in their system. Cross matching of blood type between donor and recipient will be undertaken before giving a transfusion.

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Oh My Mozzie! They are everywhere. The big ones, the small ones and every size in between. You don’t dare leave the house without insect repellent for fear of being carried away by them. And they will only continue to get worse over the next few weeks.

After lasts weeks deluge, courtesy of ex-tropical cyclone Debbie, we were inundated with flood water, which although mostly subsided it has left some still water and puddles behind and this is providing the perfect conditions for mosquitoes to multiply.

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I saw a snake the other day near our garage. After the initial jumping, squealing and running away, I calmed down enough to realise it was only a green tree snake and I just left it alone and it went on its merry way.

Living on acreage in South East Queensland means we do occasionally see snakes, so it wasn’t the first time and certainly won’t be the last time that I will have a snake encounter. But it got me to thinking about first aid for snake bites and what I would do if someone or one of the animals were bitten.

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The beautiful hot and humid Australian Summer weather has well and truly arrived! Here are a few things to remember to keep your pet happy, healthy and safe this summer.

Parasites
In the hot summer months parasites like fleas, ticks and worms thrive and can be detrimental to your pet’s health. It is important to keep flea treatments up to date, even if you don’t see any fleas on your pet. It is much easier to prevent a flea outbreak rather than eradicate one. Also be sure to use tick prevention, especially if you live in a tick area. The deadly paralysis tick can kill a pet within days, so be sure to use a tick treatment product and check your pet daily. With more mosquitoes around during summer it means that there is a higher risk of heartworm being transmitted, so be sure to stay compliant with your pets heartworm prevention. Also make sure your pet’s intestinal worming program is up to date.

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Some of the vet-n-pet DIRECT canine team members!

Each year on the first Friday after June 19th, it is Take Your Dog To Work Day. Take Your Dog To Work Day is a day in which businesses are encouraged to allow staff members to bring their canine friends to the workplace. But let’s not forget our furry feline friends as they can be great workplace companions as well. The initiative aims to show people the benefits of companion animals and to encourage people to adopt a pet.

Many studies have shown the benefits of pet ownership on health and reducing stress levels in people, but did you know that there are many positive benefits to having pets in the workplace? Benefits of pets in the workplace include;
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dog-1228570_640Yes some dogs eat poo! It is disgusting and rather gross to think about but it does happen.

Coprophagia is the term given to the act of consuming faeces. Coprophagia is often seen in puppies but it usually stops as dog’s reach adolescence and adulthood. There are many reasons, both medical and behavioural, that a dog may eat their own (or someone else’s) faeces including;

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soldier-919202_640Alongside our brave men and women who serve and protect our country are some very special, well trained dogs. As a dog lover it melts my heart to see some of the beautiful images and tributes that go around on social media about soldiers and their dog’s. The bond that these soldiers and their dog’s have is remarkable and based on trust, respect and love.

The most common breeds used as military dogs are German Shepherds and Belgian Shepherd Malinois, however many other breeds and crossbreeds are used, provided the individual dog is well suited to the job at hand. Training these dogs takes a lot of time, effort and commitment. Understandably the dog and handler form a very unique bond built on trust and mutual respect.

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image source:  http://www.trulymadlykids.co.uk/

Image source: www.trulymadlykids.co.uk/

With Easter just around the corner I thought now was a good time to remind you all about how dangerous chocolate is for dog’s. Chances are you have heard that chocolate can kill dog’s and it’s not just an old wives tale, it is a fact! But why is chocolate so dangerous for dog’s?

There are two dangerous compounds in chocolate that are toxic to dog’s and other pets. These are Theobromine and Caffeine, they are both members of the drug class Methylxanines. Theobromine is the most dangerous compound and is found in the cocoa beans that are used to make chocolate. Theobromine is easily metabolised by humans but because dog’s process it more slowly it can build up in their system to toxic levels.

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Jack

Jack

Last week I was fur-sitting my brothers dog “Jack”. Jack is a 3 year old Kelpie x Labrador x bit of everything that was rescued from a shelter.

One afternoon I went to pick the kids up from school and as always I left Jack outside and Beau (my dog) inside the house. Upon return from school pick up, Jack was nowhere to be seen. The kids and I searched everywhere, calling out for him, whistling and nothing. He isn’t the type of dog to try and escape or ever wander (he is just too lazy), but we couldn’t find him! So off we trekked through the horse paddocks looking for him, checking the dam, just encase he went for swim, but still nothing. By this stage I was starting to panic and the kids were crying “you lost Jack”. So next we jumped in the car and drove around to all the neighbours asking if they had seen him. Drove up and down all of the surrounding roads calling out for him. I rang the local pound, three local vets and checked Facebook lost and found sites and still nothing!

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